Christ Church Cathedral

Christ Church Cathedral

Christ Church Cathedral is also called the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity. Along with St. Patrick's Cathedral, it is currently the oldest Anglican church in Dublin. 

Construction and reconstruction

Established as a small wooden temple in 1038 by the Vikings, it was rebuilt in stone in 1172. However, it took nearly a century to complete.  

In 1562 the church’s dome collapsed, which also damaged part of the building and was reconstructed during the seventeenth century.

The Cathedral needed to be restored again two centuries later and remedial work was undertaken between 1871 and 1878. Christ Church Cathedral became neo-Gothic in style.

Highlights

The charming Christ Church Cathedral has a large arched crypt that dates from the twelfth century. It is the oldest structure still standing in Dublin. It houses several exhibits and a peculiar coffee house.

The chapel to St Laurence O’Toole features a small shrine where the saint’s heart is kept.

A small bridge built in 1870 connects Christ Church to Dublinia, one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions.

The church’s belfry houses 19 bells, which have been added throughout the years. One of the bells dates from 1038 when the church was first built.  

An important temple

Dublin is full of interesting churches to visit. Nevertheless, Christ Church Cathedral is one of the city’s most important places of worship. It is well-worth visiting! 

Schedule

March and October:
Monday to Saturday: 9:30am - 6pm
Sunday: 12:30pm - 2:30pm/4:30pm - 6pm. 
April - September:
Monday to Saturday: 9:30am - 7pm
Sunday: 12:30pm - 2:30pm/4:30pm - 7pm
November - February
Monday to Saturday: 9:30am - 5pm
Sunday: 12:30pm -2:30pm

Price

Adults: 6.50€
Concessions: 5€
Free entry with the Dublin Pass
If you purchase a ticket to see Dublinia: 14,50€  

Transport

Buses: Christchurch Place, lines 49X, 50X, 54A and 78A.

Nearby places

Dublinia (36 m)
St. Audoen's Church (198 m)
Chester Beatty Library (261 m)
Dublin Castle (287 m)
Dublin City Hall (288 m)